Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 34 items for :

  • "Contributing Factors" x
  • Refine by Access: All content x
Clear All
Christopher R. Brigham
,
Stephen L. Demeter
, and
E. Ranolph Soo Hoo

certain industries. Hence, comprehensive occupational histories and regular health surveillance of workers exposed to these hazards are vital to improving early detection and prevention of lung cancer and other related conditions. Conclusion Evaluating the contributing factors for pulmonary disease is critically important in assessing impairment. Taking a thorough history, including the patient's tobacco and environmental exposures, is essential in assessing cardiopulmonary issues. References 1. Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry . What

in AMA Guides® Newsletter
James Talmage
,
J. Mark Melhorn
, and
Mark H. Hyman

American Medical Association, 2011 Reviewed by David A. Fetter, MD, FAAOS, FAADEP, CEDIR Diplomate American Board of Orthopaedic Surgery Fellow American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons Fellow American Academy of Disability Evaluating Physicians Certification in Impairment and Disability Rating - American Academy of Disability Evaluating Physician The second edition of “ Return to Work,” in one word, is a masterpiece. The authors are to be congratulated for their scientific approach to a topic that at times has nonscientific contributing factors

in AMA Guides® Newsletter
Daniel C. Schainholz
,
August Colenbrander
, and
Christopher R. Brigham

scoring. In the context of a medicolegal report, the only conclusive way to determine whether the visual field is full, as expected for a corneal abrasion, or whether an underlying visual field defect exists (which might have been a contributing factor to the abrasion), is to perform full field manual kinetic perimetry. With only the III4e isopter, this takes approximately 10 minutes or less per eye. If normal, the visual field score will drop out of the basic rule equation (Section 12.4a.1, 5th ed, 296), but if underlying retinal, optic nerve, or neuro

in AMA Guides® Newsletter
James J. Mangraviti Jr
and
Christopher R. Brigham

clear that those provisions contemplate apportionment only when a prior disability, as defined by the AMA Guides, is a contributing factor to a subsequent industrial injury. Here, because Askew had an asymptomatic, degenerative back condition, there was no prior disability as contemplated by the statutes and the AMA Guides, and apportionment was therefore inappropriate. Thus, we reverse the judgment of the court of appeals and remand for further proceedings consistent with this opinion. At 1339. Conclusion The Guides bases impairment ratings upon

in AMA Guides® Newsletter
Marjorie Eskay-Auerbach

segments. 5 The biomechanics of adjacent segment degeneration have been studied, and the exact mechanism is uncertain. Relatively recent literature has led to the identification of genetics as a significant contributing factor to the rate at which disc degeneration occurs in the spine. 6 Hilibrand and Robbins reviewed the literature and noted that the rate of degeneration in the cervical spine was similar in patients treated with anterior decompression with fusion and posterior decompression without fusion. 3 Other studies have identified significant increases in

in AMA Guides® Newsletter
Kathryn Mueller
and
Charles N Brooks

this issue often determining whether a claim will be filed and accepted. Definitions Following are some definitions important when discussing causality. Cause: According to the Guides , Causation means that a physical, chemical, or biologic factor, which may or may not be work related, contributed to the occurrence of a medical condition [4th ed, 316]. Proximate cause may be defined as the last contributing factor to an injury or illness, without which it would not have occurred. Effect: An effect is a new or altered (usually worsened) condition

in AMA Guides® Newsletter
Garson Caruso
and
Les Kertay

biomedical approach is appropriate in most instances. Work-relevant conditions are usually valid work-related illnesses or injuries complicated by pre-existing, coincident, or consequent non-work-related influences (eg, osteoarthritis, chronic pain, or psychological factors) and may adversely affect recovery and stay at work/return to work, regardless of etiology and causation. Contributing Factors in DFRUD The relationships among these elements can be represented by a simple model, as seen in Figure 1 . There are six major domains of influence on DFRUD

in AMA Guides® Newsletter
Restricted access
Leon H Ensalada
and
Christopher R. Brigham

10 nor the costs associated with erroneous estimates of impairment or disability. Contributing Factors Numerous factors contribute to the somatization process. As indicated in Table 1 , 11 developmental factors within the family unit can predispose individuals to somatization. In addition, somatization is subject to cultural molding. It is prevalent in cultures that legitimize physical disease but not mental disorders. Our health care system expresses this cultural bias by providing financial payment for medical expenses or disability compensation for

in AMA Guides® Newsletter
Restricted access
Leon Ensalada
,
Christopher R. Brigham
, and
Les Kertay

in 45.8% to 59.7% of Social Security Disability adult examinations. 11 CONTRIBUTING FACTORS Numerous factors contribute to the somatization process. As indicated in Table 1 , 12 developmental factors within the family unit can predispose individuals to somatization. In addition, somatization is subject to cultural molding. It is prevalent in cultures that legitimize physical disease but not mental disorders. Our health care system expresses this cultural bias by providing financial payment for medical expenses or disability compensation for physical

in AMA Guides® Newsletter