Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 12 items for

  • Author or Editor: James Talmage x
  • Refine by Access: Freely available content x
Clear All Modify Search
Jay Blaisdell
and
James B. Talmage

Abstract

Appropriately assessing impairment mandates that the physician be familiar with the principles of assessing impairment, as reflected in Chapter 1, Conceptual Foundations and Philosophy, and Chapter 2, Practical Applications of the Guides. Based on this knowledge, the physician will then apply the processes and criteria provided in specific chapters. All impairment rating reports should be divided into three main sections: clinical evaluation, analysis of the findings, and discussion. To obtain the highest level of competency, the rating physician should be familiar with jurisdictional requirements that effectively supplant AMA Guides to the Evaluation of Permanent Impairment (AMA Guides) methodology.

in AMA Guides® Newsletter
Robert B. Snyder
and
James B. Talmage

Abstract

The decision about whether a case of documented COVID-19 illness is accepted as occupationally acquired and thus work compensable is made by insurers, or if contested, by judges or administrative bureaus. Causation for COVID-19 may be difficult to show because of the lack of accurate information and difficulty in meeting some of the criteria established by Bradford Hill. Nevertheless, physicians will be asked for medical records and documentation of illness. This article provides preliminary guidance to assist physicians in responding to insurers or workers compensation agencies' requests for information on the medial aspects of COVID-19.

in AMA Guides® Newsletter
Christopher R. Brigham
,
Charles N. Brooks
, and
James F. Talmage
in AMA Guides® Newsletter
James B. Talmage
,
Mark H. Hyman
, and
Robert B. Snyder

Abstract

The current pandemic of COVID-19 cases includes cases identified in emergency medical technicians, nurses, physicians, and others with occupational exposure to the SARS-CoV-2 virus. Many of these health care professionals have filed workers' compensation claims that have been accepted. Each accepted claim will eventually need a physician to declare the individual “at maximal medical improvement” or the equivalent phrase in the jurisdiction involved. The next step is for the physician to rate permanent impairment, if present, so the case can be administratively closed. The AMA Guides to the Evaluation of Permanent Impairment (AMA Guides) is used by many jurisdictions, but the AMA Guides does not mention COVID-19 or have guidance on how to assess individuals for impairment after recovery from this illness. This article provides preliminary guidance on rating permanent impairment within the respiratory, cardiac, vascular, neurologic, renal, gastrointestinal, and/or mental systems in COVID-19 survivors. Current references on the manifestations of COVID-19 illness in these body systems are included, which can be used as references to support documented impairment related to this illness.

in AMA Guides® Newsletter
Christopher Brigham
,
Lorne K. Direnfeld
,
Steven Feinberg
,
Les Kertay
, and
James B. Talmage

Abstract

The AMA Guides to the Evaluation of Permanent Impairment (AMA Guides), Sixth Edition, states that an independent medical evaluation (IME) usually is a “one-time evaluation performed by an independent medical examiner who is not treating the patient or claimant, to answer questions posed by the party requesting the IME.” Evaluators must adhere to best practice standards and must know that these standards may change over time and must meet the needs of the relevant jurisdiction. IMEs take place in several arenas, including automobile casualty, workers’ compensation, personal injury, medical malpractice, and long-term disability and differ from traditional clinical evaluations. The evaluating physician must be independent and has no (or only a limited) physician–patient relationship. The qualifications required of an IME examiner vary by arena, jurisdiction, and issues. Medical evaluators should be board certified and can obtain a special credential from, eg, the American Board of Independent Medical Examiners or the International Association of Independent Medical Evaluators. In addition, evaluators should have demonstrated abilities in report writing and court testimony, and a section of this article provides a general outline of the topics that should be covered in a thorough report. Quality IME reports are the result of thoughtful, thorough evaluations performed by physicians who have knowledge, skills, and experience in both clinical medicine and the assessment of medicolegal issues.

in AMA Guides® Newsletter